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Camera Archive - Page 2 of 4 - CINEGEARBLOG.COM

Tag Archive: Camera


The FCC gives you the chance to see the private parts of a RED EPIC-M digital cinema camera.

FCC-EPIC-M-MYSTERIUM-X-SENSOR-CineGear

Read more at FCC.gov.

Den Lennie and Alister Chapman did a quick comparison of the Sony NEX FS100 & PMW-F3 S35 EXMOR cameras.

The main aim of the shoot was to see how the FS100 held up against the F3. We shot on a bright sunny day by the River Thames and again in the evening in a typically lit living room. There were no big surprises. The FS100 is remarkably close to the F3. You would have no problems cutting between the two of them in a project.

I did find that the FS100 LCD appeared less sharp and not quite as good as the F3′s even though they both use the same underlying panel. This is probably down to the additional layers required for touch screen operation on the FS100. I also did not like the 18-200mm f5.6 kit lens. There was too much lag in the focus and iris controls, but the beauty of this camera is that you can use a multitude of lenses. For the evening shoot I used a Nikon 50mm f1.8 which was so much nicer to use. On reviewing the footage I did find that we were tending to over expose the FS100 by half a stop to a stop, this does make making accurate comparisons difficult and I apologise for this. I believe this was down to the slightly different images we were seeing on the LCD’s. I did use the histograms on both cameras to try to ensure even exposure, but even so there is a difference. A small part of this is also likely down to the very slightly different contrast ranges of the two cameras.

Oe thing we discovered, not mentioned in the video is that when you use a full frame lens, like the Nikon 50mm. You must ensure that the E-Mount adapter you use has an internal baffle or choke. If it doesn’t you will suffer from excessive flare. The adapter I had did not have a baffle and some shots (not used) were spoilt by flare. The adapter I have from MTF for the F3 has a baffle as do MTF’s E-Mount adapters, so these should not suffer from this issue.

The FS100 performance is so very close to that of the F3′s (at 8 bit 4:2:0, 35Mb/s) that it is hard to tell the two apart. I believe the F3′s images are just a tiny bit richer, with about half a stop more dynamic range, in most cases it takes a direct side by side comparison to show up the differences.

The range of camera settings and adjustments on the FS100 is not quite as extensive as on the F3, nor do the adjustments have such a broad range. However there is plenty of flexibility for most productions.

If you don’t need 10 bit 4:2:2 then it is hard to justify the additional cost of the F3, both cameras really are very good. Despite some other reports else where I felt the build quality to be very good and the buttons, while small, are big enough and well placed. If you do want autofocus then you will be pleased to know that it actually works pretty well on the FS100 with only minimal hunting (of course you must use an AF compatible lens).

I did also record the HDMI output to one of my NanoFlashes at 100Mb/s. Comparing these side by side it is extremely hard to see any difference. It is only when you start to heavily grade the material that the advantage of the higher bit rate Nanoflash material becomes apparent. There is less mosquito noise in the NanoFlash material. I was really impressed by the AVCHD material. The lack of noise in the images really helps.

The FS100 really is the F3′s little brother. The pictures are remarkably close, which they should be as they share the same sensor. The FS100 packs down into a remarkably small size for transport. The loan camera from Sony was actually packed in a case designed for the MC1P mini-cam, about 15″x10″x5″ so very compact indeed. The F3 is considerably larger and bulkier, in part due to the extra space taken up by the built in ND filters.

The lack of ND filters does need to be considered. There are some clever solutions in the pipelines from various manufacturers as well as existing solutions such as vari ND’s, screw on ND’s and a Matte Box with ND’s, so it’s not a deal breaker

I think there is every chance that the FS100 will be the first NXCAM camera that I will purchase. It will be a good companion to my F3. It’s modular design will allow me to get shots that are not possible with the F3. I felt that the FS100 (with the 18-200mm lens that I don’t like) was better suited to “run and gun” than my F3 with either manual DSLR lenses or PL glass. You can, with the FS100 simply point the camera at your subject and hit the one push auto focus and auto iris and have an in-focus, correctly exposed shot. This is much more like a traditional small sensor camcorder in this respect. The long zoom range also makes this more like a conventional camcorder, although there is no servo for the zoom.

In conclusion, in my opinion, for “run and gun” or quick and dirty setups the FS100 with the 18-200mm lens has an edge over the F3 due to the fast auto focus and auto iris one-push controls. For more precise work and shallow DoF your going to want a different lens, something with manual control and calibrated focus and iris scales. For more demanding shoots then the F3 is probably the better choice with it’s slightly improved dynamic range and the ability to use S-Log and 4:4:4. In either case these cameras can produce highly cinematic pictures and I see no reason why you could not shoot a great looking feature with either.

Read more at xdcam-user.com.

It’s here. It’s hot. It’s Technicolor CineStyle Picture Style for Canon EOS Cameras.

Get it here: I want that damn sweet Picture Style

Here’s what you need to do to get it working:

1. Requirements:

  • Canon EOS DSLR camera
  • Canon EOS Utility v2.6 or later
  • PC running Windows 7 / Vista / XP; or Mac running OS X 10.5 / 10.6
  • USB cable
Note: you can find the latest Canon EOS Utility at: Canon.com

2. How to load Technicolor CineStyle into your Canon EOS camera:

  • Ensure that EOS Utility v2.6 or later is installed on your computer
  • Download the Technicolor CineStyle Picture Style file using the links below
  • Connect your camera to your computer using the appropriate USB cable
  • Note: for the EOS 5D Mark II you may need to set “Communication” to “PC connect.” in the camera’s menu
  • Start the Canon EOS Utility
  • Select “Camera settings/Remote shooting” on the main window
  • Once the capture window opens, click the camera icon
  • Click “Register User Defined style” under “Shooting menu”
  • Once the new page “Register Picture Style File” opens, select one of User Def. 1, 2 or 3 at the top of the new page
  • Click the open file icon
  • Select the CineStyle.pf2 file you’ve just downloaded
  • Click on OK

Congratulations, the Technicolor CineStyle Picture Style is now loaded in your camera! You should confirm that the Picture Style has been properly loaded by pressing the Picture Style selection button at the back of the camera and using the thumbwheel on top of the camera to scroll through the styles

3. Recommended Canon EOS camera settings with Technicolor:

Based on Technicolor’s usage and testing of its CineStyle Picture Style, we recommend the following camera settings to optimize the image quality of your Canon EOS camera:

  • Sharpness: 0
  • Contrast: -4
  • Saturation: -2
  • Color Tone: 0
  • ISO: a multiple of 160

4. Post-processing for Technicolor CineStyle:

Acquisition with Technicolor’s CineStyle will generate what appears to be a flat, de-saturated looking image. While this image may appear unappealing and undesirable, it is in fact an ideal starting point for post-production and color correction.

To properly color correct and/or view footage shot with Technicolor CineStyle we recommend utilizing a S-curve shaped look-up table (LUT) in your editing or color correction application. You may download such a LUT using the links provided.

If your editing or color correction application does not offer the ability to import and use LUTs, other controls like the ASC CDL, Lift/Gamma/Gain, or Offset/Power/Slope can be used to color correct the image.

James Cameron ordered 50 RED EPIC-M cameras.

Read more at REDUSER.net

Jim posted some words at REDUSER.net:

Many people want to know what’s up with EPIC and Scarlet production.

EPIC-X. We are frantically working on finding solutions to supply chain issues created by the tsunami in Japan. We have found alternate sources (as have all of the other major companies) of parts that were exclusively made in Northern Japan. All of us are just waiting and in line for these parts and pieces. It appears that a solution to the supply of these parts will allow production of EPIC-X to begin in earnest in June. We have a full production facility and 98% of the components ready and waiting to rock as soon as we receive these parts.

EPIC-M. We are making machined body parts and purchasing individual parts and pieces at extraordinary prices now to continue production of EPIC-M.

Scarlet continues to be an issue due to the fact that lens components from Japan are causing an issue and we aren’t quite sure how long it will take to resolve. We will update as we have more info.

In the past we were late due to our own issues. Now we are late due to issues beyond anyone’s control.

Jim

Read more at REDUSER.net

Get the first draft of the EPIC operation guide.

Read more at REDUSER.net

Jim Jannard wrote something about the relationship between Hollywood directors and RED cameras:

David Fincher said “I choose RED over film” and is shooting “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” on RED. Peter Jackson said “RED looks like 65mm film”… and is shooting “The Hobbit” on EPICs. John Schwartzman is shooting “The Amazing Spider-man” on EPICs in 3D. Dariusz Wolski shot “Pirates 4” on RED and chose RED again for Ridley Scott’s “Prometheus”. “The Social Network” was given an Academy nomination for Best Cinematography. Steven Soderbergh has chosen RED for 6 straight films. “Jack the Giant Killer” and “Underworld 4” are currently shooting RED.

These guys have shot film most of their careers and have done side by side testing of all the latest digital offerings. Yet they are now shooting RED. What is it that they know?

Forget the story, actors, set design, wardrobe, and makeup for a minute. What they know is what an image should look like. None of these guys will compromise the image for anything… their reputation and finished product depends on the best image they cam make.

So… why RED? They all have the budget to shoot anything they want. What do they know that us mortals don’t?

1. They understand dynamic range, resolution… and “feel” of an image. All matter in combination.

2. They understand that their final product is headed for the “big screen”. What resolution might be “good enough” for a 42″ screen today may not be good enough for a 40′ screen. And what is good enough for today’s home theater may quickly change.

3. They have figured out the best way to get the best results from RED footage… more on this below.

4. They appreciate the value of on set feedback and have a good “hourlies” workflow.

5. They understand the value of shooting RAW and the flexibility it gives them for a final grade.

6. They understand lighting and how that effects the final image. Lighting… what separates the men from the boys.

So how do they get the very best image from RED?

They stay in REDCODE RAW as long as possible. Whether you use REDCINE-X or Pablo, stay in REDCODE RAW until the very end. Don’t make DPX files 1st and then grade. Limiting the color space, range and white balance right off the bat is not a good thing. Don’t do it. This is true if the final output is a DCP package or a film print. For VFX… use Log space and 16 bit EXRs. The very LAST thing you should do for a DCP output is make DPX files.

The pros know how to light and expose. If you have aspirations to make great images… learn these two thing 1st. There is no longer an excuse to blame the equipment. Too many great looking features have been Shot on RED. If your stuff doesn’t look right, you are doing something wrong. Ask for help.

We are proud of the big projects being shot on RED… the biggest projects actually. We are just as proud to be able to put RED in the hands of may aspiring cinematographers. We are here to help you learn the craft. There is no mystery… just hard work and a lot of info to be learned.

Now… back to the story, actors, set design, wardrobe and makeup.

Jim

Read more at REDUSER.net

Andrew Reid demystifies low light tests.

Every time you see a low light test, the pictures look good. Andrew shows us how it looks in the real life outside of any testing situation.

Read more at EOSHD.com

Jim Jannard said something regarding ALEXA vs. EPIC:

There is a lot of controversy about the Alexa vs. EPIC. Rightly so.

(This post was done in response to misinformation that seems to be spreading… I’d probably do a more elegant take if I could wind back the clock)

Here is the official RED take on the subject.

The Alexa makes great images. No question about it.

The EPIC makes great images. No question about it.

The Alexa is a small camera.

The EPIC is a smaller camera… about 1/3 the size of an Alexa.

EPIC has 6 times the resolution of Alexa. (as normally shot). EPIC has 5 times more measured resolution comparing best case for each cameras.

Alexa has a stop more native dynamic range than EPIC. Good on them.

EPIC has 3 stops more DR than Alexa using HDRx. Good on us.

EPIC is mostly ownable.

Alexa is mostly rentable.

(probably not a necessary point to post)

EPIC is modular. You can upgrade parts and pieces of EPIC. Even the just announced RED Dragon sensor is an upgrade.

Alexa is modular (Alexa-M). You can split apart the sensor and tether to the electronics. A different type of modular… and this is a different model Alexa than everyone owns so far.

Arri is a 70 year old company. RED is a 5 year old company. RED is scary. Arri apparently is not.

Alexa shoots 1080P Prores to a flash card or 2K uncompressed RAW to a Codex box.

EPIC shoots 5K to an SSD.

Alexa shoots 1080P at 60fps.

EPIC shoots 5K @ 120fps.

EPIC can shoot high res stills at 5K.

It should be noted that Sony has announced a new 4K camera… the F65. While I’m not sure how 8K x 2K outputs to 4K, this is a serious introduction to the industry and should be considered as an real alternative. We especially like that Sony has acknowledged the importance of 4K. Coupled with Sony’s 4K projectors… it appears that 4K is here as the new standard. Rightfully so. Film would be proud.

Jim

Read more at REDUSER.net

cinema5D reported that the signal, which comes out of the HDMI of the Sony NEX-FS100 is in fact 4:4:4 8bit.

“Yes, I’ll confirm that the HDMI out on the FS100 is 4:4:4 8bit. That is what the FS100 product manager at Sony told me right to my face. Don’t forget that these are pre-preproduction models and the specifications are still changing. Last week Sony may have said the camera was 4:2:2 in their literature, now they are saying 4:4:4. I have no way of measuring it myself, but I trust 100% what I have been told.

The camera and an HDMI recorder talk to each other. If the recorder can handle 4:4:4 then that’s what the camera will send. If the recorder says it can only handle 4:2:2, then that’s what the camera will send. No menus need to be changed. The two-way communication is automatic.”

Read and discuss at cinema5D.com